SORROW & LOSS

20 June 2017

How to live with knowing the future

For a second time, I’m reading When Breath Becomes Air by surgeon and author Paul Kalanithi. At age 36 and on a career path that was spiraling upward, Dr. Kalanithi was rudely interrupted. By a lung cancer diagnosis.

 

Photo credit: Freeaudiobookguide.com

 

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2 June 2017

Maintaining bonds with our deceased loved ones

The park on my parents-in-law’s ranch in the remote hills of northern California had been decorated in fernery, and Gary and I were married beneath the monkey bars (don’t read anything into that).

 

Casterlin Ranch park (photo: Oliver Johnson)

 

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15 May 2017

Putting dreams on paper

I’m at a coffee shop—one of those fabulous local places where the high ceilings thrum with industrial pipes and funky lighting, and a large garage-style door is open to let in the mountain air—waiting for two of my creative team members.

Jim and Michelle are meeting me here to brainstorm over some needed changes to website, brand name, tagline, purpose. Who do I want to reach? What’s the best way to get there?

 

Photo: Unsplash

 

Which means, stay tuned for some exciting changes!

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9 May 2017

How spontaneous are you?

On a fine spring day this week, I had a hankering to trek back to the place where I scattered my husband’s ashes after he died of cancer, after he lived much much longer than the original prognosis: Ten preposterous, brimming, courageous years with late stage disease.

 

Broken Top standing guard over a frozen Todd Lake

 

Do you think there’s a difference between being spontaneous and being impulsive?

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2 April 2017

Celebrating a life well lived: Random thoughts

Family and friends gathered in Idaho this weekend to celebrate a life well lived: Mom-in-law Ivalene, who died of complications due to pancreatic cancer.

 

Jack and Ivalene Johnson, 1946

 

Since yesterday’s Celebration of Life service, a few random thoughts have been swirling in my brain:

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5 March 2017

11 secrets I learned about living after losing

After my husband, Gary, died of cancer, I relocated to southern California, claimed my daughter-in-law’s pink-rimmed bike as my own, and said Yes to several not-necessarily-planned-far-in-advance adventures.

 

Venice Beach with my pink-rimmed ride

 

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14 February 2017

Is this how death should be?

Mom-in-law Ivalene died this week from complications due to pancreatic cancer. We thought we had six to twelve months left with her. And then the call: “She’s in transition. The hospice nurse doesn’t think she’ll last through the day.”

 

Photo credit: Unsplash

 

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1 January 2017

Can 2016 losses be turned into 2017 gains?

New beginnings have always energized me. The challenge of a new deadline, the anticipation of a change in seasons, the turning of calendar pages to a fresh, hope-filled New Year.

But what if we’re still reeling from loss as the calendar page turns? Is it possible to take the hard and turn it into good in 2017? It is.

 

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Photo credit: Pixabay

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5 December 2016

3 thoughts on outward focus

My husband, Gary, and I were anticipating hiking a new trail with friends. Four-in-One Cone in the Sisters (Oregon) Wilderness with views of seven distinct massive rock-solid peaks. As we began our climb, we found ourselves in the clouds. Dense. Gray. No mountain views in sight. Worse, I couldn’t seem to get warm; I was focused too much on the damp coldness.

A week later, Gary and I hiked the same trail and climbed the same cinder cone. This time, the views were stunning. And although it was cold, my focus was on the splendid 360-degree canvas in shades of blues and whites.

 

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North and Middle Sister, left to right (Photo credit: Gary Johnson)

 

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28 November 2016

7 great reasons to hope

My practical analytical down-to-earth no-nonsense wry-humored (handsome) husband once said to me: “If you didn’t get your hopes up so much, you wouldn’t get so disappointed.”

I don’t know about that philosophy. It sounds pretty hope-less to me.

 

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Photo credit: Unsplash

 

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About Me

Hello, my name is Marlys Johnson. I’m a cancer widow, author, speaker and blogger. I love getting outdoors; would rather lace up hiking boots than go shopping. I have a passion for repurposing old junk into cool new stuff. And an even greater passion for showing people how to navigate life's challenges. Tenaciously. And with heart wide open.

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